Down the TBR Hole #9: Grey Edition

(All Synopsis Taken From GOODREADS)


I found out about this meme because Kris Marie from Boston Book Reader does it regularly on her blog! (Updated to her most recent one!) It, however, originated with Lost in a Story. So thanks goes to her for starting this great meme for the book blogging community!

The purpose of this meme is to go through your TBR (I am using GoodReads at first and then plan on going through my home books after!) and decide if you are going to keep the book or if you are getting rid of it on your TBR!  For a more formal understanding here is the original wording from the first “Down the TBR Hole” by Lost in a Story:

Anyway, it works like this:

Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
Order on ascending date added.
Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
Read the synopses of the books
Decide: keep it or should it go?

Currently, I have 346 books on my GR TBR (last time I didn’t get rid of ANY ugh!), so I have decided to go through five of the books on the list at a time. I am hoping to get it lowered to at least only 200 by the time this is over. Wish me luck, I am going to need it! I will also be keeping track of the number of books that I remove from my GR TBR during this process, so that a final statistical number of removed titles is available because well I can and I want to see how many I removed after all is said and done.


Synopsis: “There are days when I am less stardust than sawdust, less survivor than victim, but that does not mean that the reclamation of my own body is any less eternal.” –Jane Cochrane

“How to describe the feeling of not being believed? It is the feeling of disappearing.” –Stephanie Oakes

“I used to want to hurt you, to break you, to give you the sort of nightmares I still have so many years later.” –Melissa Marr

“It’s so easy to say you’ll fight when it’s not happening to you. But then it was happening to me. And I locked up. My bones had all linked together and I was still.” –Bryson McCrone

Things We Haven’t Said is a powerful collection of poems, essays, letters, vignettes and interviews written by a diverse group of impressive adults who survived sexual violence as children and adolescents. Structured to incorporate creative writing to engage the reader and informative interviews to dig for context, this anthology is a valuable resource of hope, grit and honest conversation that will help teens tackle the topic of sexual violence, upend stigma and maintain hope for a better future. 

Decision: Stays

Reason: This seems like a vital and important book to read, this is definitely one that I would think would be pretty impactful.


Synopsis: Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hellish for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood – where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned and, though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor – engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven – but the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. Even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre-Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.

Decision: Stays

Reason: This is another supposedly impactful book that I think would be vital for me to read at some point.


Synopsis: Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world torn apart.

Decision: Bye

Reason: This is a second book and while I own the first book I am not sure how I am going to feel about this series, so better to play it safe. If I like it this may get moved back on. I am most worried about comments about the book series that I have heard, so I am worried it may impact my enjoyment of further books in the overall series.


Synopsis: You go through life thinking there’s so much you need…

Until you leave with only your phone, your wallet, and a picture of your mother.

Marin hasn’t spoken to anyone from her old life since the day she left everything behind. No one knows the truth about those final weeks. Not even her best friend, Mabel. But even thousands of miles away from the California coast, at college in New York, Marin still feels the pull of the life and tragedy she’s tried to outrun. Now, months later, alone in an emptied dorm for winter break, Marin waits. Mabel is coming to visit, and Marin will be forced to face everything that’s been left unsaid and finally confront the loneliness that has made a home in her heart. 

Decision: Stays

Reason: I own this and actually mentioned it during “Shelf Control” that it was a book that I wanted to read badly. 


Synopsis: Critically acclaimed, award-winning British comedian and actor Eddie Izzard details his childhood, his first performances on the streets of London, his ascent to worldwide success on stage and screen, and his comedy shows which have won over audiences around the world.

Over the course of a thirty-year career, Eddie Izzard has proven himself to be a creative chameleon, inhabiting the stage and film and television screen with an unbelievable fervor. Born in Yemen, and raised in Ireland, Wales and post-war England, he lost his mother at the age of six. In his teens, he dropped out of university and took to the streets of London as part of a two-man escape act; when his partner went on vacation, Izzard kept busy by inventing a one-man act, and thus a career was ignited. As a stand-up comedian, Izzard has captivated audiences with his surreal, stream-of-consciousness comedy–lines such as “Cake or Death?” “Death Star Canteen,” and “Do You Have a Flag?” have the status of great rock lyrics. As a self-proclaimed “Executive Transvestite,” Izzard broke the mold performing in full make-up and heels, and has become as famous for his advocacy for LGBT rights as he has for his art. In Believe Me, he recounts the dizzying rise he made from street busking to London’s West End, to Wembley Stadium and New York’s Madison Square Garden. 

Still performing more than 100 shows a year–thus far in a record-breaking twenty-eight countries worldwide–Izzard is arguably one of today’s top Kings of Comedy. With his brand of keenly intelligent humor, that ranges from world history to pop culture, politics and philosophy, he has built an extraordinary fan base that transcends age, gender, and race. Writing with the same candor and razor-sharp insight evident in his comedy, he reflects on a childhood marked by unutterable loss, sexuality and coming out, as well as a life in show business, politics, and philanthropy. Honest and generous, Izzard’s Believe Me is an inspired account of a very singular life thus far.

Decision: Bye

Reason: I am not really interested in reading this and I have too much other stuff on my list that I need to read before this. I am not sure I would ever actually get around to it. 


Removal: 2 out 5 (a step in the right direction!)
Kept: 3 out of 5

Total Removed to Date: 20
Goodreads Total: 344/346 (a step closer in the right direction)


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